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  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #1

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    24
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #12

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    8
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #11

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #10

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #9

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    1
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #8

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    1
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #7

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #6

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    2
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #5

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    2
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #4

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    1
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #3

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    2
  • EBS at Waverley Abbey #2

    gedeeld door buckshot op 2013-01-27

    I hadn't seen anyone do an 'exposing both sides' (EBS) panorama album on here yet, so I figured I'd try it with a Horizon Perfekt. It was definitely one of the most technically challenging albums I've done so far - not only because EBS is itself tricky (you've got to get the homemade redscale prepared correctly, get both the redscale and normal exposures right, shoot twice in the same sequence so as not to screw up the symmetry, etc.), but because the Perfekt poses challenges of its own, such as not being able to use a conventional splitzer (I solved this by cutting a piece of black card to shape and gluing it onto the tiny UV filter that comes with the camera), not having any horizon line to line things up with in the viewfinder (solved by drawing a black line through the middle of a length of sellotape and sticking it onto the front of the viewfinder) and having its very own peculiar loading technique that makes it very difficult to re-align the film in the same place for the second shoot (I thought I'd solved this by taping a separate 15cm length of old negative to the take-up spool and taping the film I shot to this, lining it up with appropriate markings, but I still got it wrong by about half a centimetre, which is why you see some overlap in these shots). I shot the redscale layer just after sunrise, went home, flipped the film around (I think I'll get a changing bag for next time, so I can just flip the film on site), then went back and shot the normal layer just after noon, on a sunny but intermittently cloudy day. So yes, pretty challenging, but also very creatively satisfying. Worth the hassle...? Hell, yeah...!!! :-)

    1
  • Rainbow Power

    gedeeld door paulm99 op 2013-02-21

  • Rainbow Power

    gedeeld door paulm99 op 2013-02-21

  • #17323449

    gedeeld door sebastianerras op 2012-10-30

    We had some nice sunsets lately here in Paris and I took the opportunity to take a bike-ride to the Eiffel-Tower and take some pictures. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- www.analogue-love.com -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Sebastian style

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-03

    Canal x-pro kodak E100G

    22
  • #17522558

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-03

    Canal x-pro kodak E100G

    10
  • #17621954

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-24

    homemade redscale with fuji c200

  • #17621960

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-24

    homemade redscale with fuji c200

  • #17621970

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-24

    homemade redscale with fuji c200

  • #17621971

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-24

    homemade redscale with fuji c200

    2
  • #17621972

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-12-24

    homemade redscale with fuji c200

    11
  • Premiere prise en main d'un appareil moyen format léger: le Belair X 6-12

    geschreven door cwyeung op 2012-12-04 in #gear
    Premiere prise en main d'un appareil moyen format léger: le Belair X 6-12

    Le Belair X6-12 est enfin disponible dans les Lomography Gallery Stores et nous pouvons donc examiner sa prise en main. Pour ceux qui ont pré-commandé cet appareil, cet article vous permettra de vous familiariser avec lui et de bien comprendre comment il fonctionne afin de minimiser les risques de cramer certaines prises de vos premières pellicules.

  • #14845412

    gedeeld door bravebird op 2011-12-05

    Bromo-Tengger-Semeru National Park in East Java

    41
  • #16607834

    gedeeld door bravebird op 2012-07-23

    9
  • #14815347

    gedeeld door z op 2011-11-30

    8
  • Lake Shizenko in the rain

    gedeeld door hodachrome op 2012-11-01

    This lake was formed by a natural earthen dam after a large earthquake. Withered, skeletal trees stand in the lake. Love the view from here.

    11
  • Twilight

    gedeeld door sondyy op 2011-02-09

    inspiration by motion picture cold

    29
  • #17504115

    gedeeld door hanat9651 op 2012-11-29

    Some Black & White shots...

    1
  • double

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-09-18

    15
  • #16982586

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-09-10

  • #16982748

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-09-10

  • #16982743

    gedeeld door realrampage op 2012-09-10

    problem with Development

    2
  • #15999518

    gedeeld door phoenix1206 op 2012-05-07

    2
  • Lomo walk

    gedeeld door badjuju op 2011-04-28

    How I like to spend my me time :D

    13
  • #16730457

    gedeeld door theyremorerectangular op 2012-08-07

    3